Guiding Lights

I promise that actual content will come soon, but you have to build the theater before you start having plays, right?

If you’re successful, people will try to copy what you do. But there’s a great way to protect yourself from copycats:

– Make you part of your product or service. Inject what’s unique about the way you think into what you sell.

Pour yourself into your product and everything around your product too: how you sell it, how you support it, how you explain it, and how you deliver it. Competitors can never copy the you in your product.

by Ali Mese

 

Certain Failure

Normal content should be coming anytime soon, but I’ve just realised I never posted this one here, so, fixing that.

Last night, a comedian tried out some new material, and someone in the front row didn’t laugh.

Last week, I put up a post with a new idea in it, and thousands of people who read it didn’t retweet or share it.

Last year, someone ran for office and didn’t get every single vote cast.

Failure! Certain failure.

Of course your next project isn’t going to delight everyone. That’s impossible. It’s certain that for some people, your project is going to be a failure.

At the same time, it’s also quite unlikely that your project will please no one.

So now, we can agree that it’s all on a spectrum, and that success and failure are merely localized generalizations.

Once you realize that failure is certain, it’s a lot easier to focus on impact instead.

(as always) by Seth Godin

What if scale wasn’t the goal?

From restaurants to direct mail, there’s pressure to be scalable, to be efficient, to create something easily replicated.

Which is often used as the reason it’s not very good. “Well, we’d like to spend more time/more care/more focus on this, but we need to get bigger.”

What if you started in the other direction?

What would happen if you created something noteworthy and worried about scale only after you’ve figured out how to make a difference?

Seth Godin

Marketing in four steps

The first step is to invent a thing worth making, a story worth telling, a contribution worth talking about.

The second step is to design and build it in a way that people will actually benefit from and care about.

The third one is the one everyone gets all excited about. This is the step where you tell the story to the right people in the right way.

The last step is so often overlooked: The part where you show up, regularly, consistently and generously, for years and years, to organize and lead and build confidence in the change you seek to make.

by Seth Godin